Updates

Congress Playing Partisan Politics with Immigrant Families: House Republicans Vote for Anti-immigrant Amendments In Attempt to Roll Back Executive Order

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 14, 2015

Contact: 

Anna Duncan
anna@domesticworkers.org
440-204-8284

Washington, DC--In the first week of the GOP-controlled Congress, House Republicans have given America a clear picture of their immigration agenda--restart the deportation machine and separate more immigrant families. This morning the House voted to pass the Homeland Security Appropriation Bill, HR 240, with five anti-immigrant amendments aimed at gutting President Obama’s Executive Action and eliminating DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and DAPA (Deferred Action for Parental Accountability).

Detaining women and children ‘is just plain wrong’

Author: 
Griselda Nevarez
Source: 
VOXXI

The opening of a new family immigration detention center has drawn criticism from advocates who argue it is inappropriate to detain women and their children who pose no threat to national security.

The 50-acre facility, located about 80 miles from the southern border in a small Texas town called Dilley, will soon become the country’s largest family immigration detention center. It will first hold up to 480 people but will expand to a maximum capacity of 2,400 once construction nearby is finished in May.

With drawings and letters, 1,000s of kids ask Congress for immigration reform

Source: 
Fox News Latino

With drawings and more than 4,000 letters, thousands of children on Tuesday asked Republican congressional leaders for comprehensive immigration reform to complement the recent executive action by President Barack Obama, to whom they directed words of affection and thanks.

The "We Belong Together" organization collected 4,000 letters from boys and girls around the country and ensured that 400 of the missives were delivered to the White House and Congress.

Analysis of Executive Action on Immigration and Priorities for Women

On November 20, 2014 President Obama took an historic step toward fixing our broken immigration system by announcing several executive actions his administration will undertake. This analysis examines how the six women’s priorities identified by We Belong Together were honored by the President’s executive action and highlights the areas in which the struggle for a fair and humane immigration system continues.

Immigration Laws and Legislation: Immigrant Rights Groups React to President Obama's Reform Plan

Author: 
Rebecca S. Myles
Source: 
Latin Post

Immigrant rights groups have fought long and hard to press for immigration reform through protests in the nation's capital and across the nation.

They've handled disappointment after President Obama twice postponed announcing any kind of resolution to remove punitive programs that tore families apart through its secure communities program or provide any relief for the many decades immigrant families had contributed and supported the American economy. On Thursday night in a 15-minute speech, some families finally heard of plans that will provide some relief.

What Will Happen to the Immigrants Left Out of Obama’s Executive Actions?

Author: 
Michelle Chen
Source: 
The Nation

In his speech last night announcing his latest executive action on immigration policy, President Obama took great pains to tell the country what his new immigration policy is not: it is not “amnesty,” just a way for people to avoid deportation; it is not citizenship, just work authorization; it won’t provide social welfare benefits, it will just allow employers to keep exploiting immigrant labor.

Obama Immigration Plan to Boost Low-Wage Workers

Author: 
Katherine Peralta
Source: 
USA Today

Jeannette Vizguerra is a mother of four from Mexico City who has been in the U.S. for 17 years. She’s made a living in Denver working in jobs from housekeeping to food vending, though she’s undocumented.

“Practically my whole family is here now,” she says, who along with her husband, brings in about $3,200 a month for the family of six.

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